Report event

Reporting an event

This is how to notify the CAA HSU of a Notifiable Event under HSWA that occurred while an aircraft was in operation.  If you need to check if your event is notifiable use our Notifiable Event Tool.

NOTE: Notifying the CAA HSU of the Notifiable Event does not satisfy the requirements to notify CAA under Part 12 reporting obligations.  

Forms

To report a Notifiable Event you will need to complete the notification using one of the two forms depending on the notification required:

  1. Notification of a Death or Notifiable Injury or Notifiable Illness; or
  2. Notification of Notifiable Incident.

How to complete and send Notification forms

These forms can be completed by opening on your computer using Adobe Reader then either:

1.           Type the information into the form and save to your computer.

2.           Print the form off and hand write in details.

Once completed either scan the handwritten form, or attach the completed PDF version and email it to Civil Aviation Authority:

isi@caa.govt.nz

If emailing this form is not practical you may post it to:

Manager Health and Safety Unit

Civil Aviation Authority

PO Box 3555

Wellington 6140

Reporting a Notifiable Event Infographic

CAA HSU have developed a one page (A3 sized) Infographic on Reporting a Notifiable Event that details the process for reporting a Notifiable Event to CAA HSU.  This can be opened, saved and printed for use in your business. 

Health and Safety Unit of the CAA

The Civil Aviation Authority is designated to administer the provisions of the Health & Safety at Work Act 2105 (HSWA) in respect of the aviation sector, specifically for aircraft while in operation.  See below for the definition of ‘operation’.

The Health & Safety Unit of the CAA was established to fulfill that function.

HSWA recognises that a well-functioning health and safety system relies on participation, leadership, and accountability by government, business and workers. 

The principle of HSWA is that workers and other persons should be given the highest level of protection against harm to their health, safety, and welfare from work risks as is reasonably practicable.

Definition of 'In Operation' and 'Work On Board'

The Prime Ministerial Designation requires the CAA to administer the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 (HSWA) for the aviation sector, specifically for aircraft while in operation.

It covers the administration of the Act for work on board aircraft and for aircraft as places of work while in operation. Specifically, from section 9(4) in operation means while the aircraft is taxiing, taking off, flying or landing.

The designation further clarifies this and the CAA may perform all the functions and exercise all the powers of the regulator under HSWA in respect of:

  1. Work to prepare an aircraft for imminent flight;
  2. Work on board an aircraft for the purpose of imminent flight or while in operation; and
  3. Aircraft as workplaces while in operation.

The CAA takes the view that:

Work On Board: Means work in respect of the aircraft operation.

In Operation: Means it is from the moment of initial movement of the aircraft until the aircraft fully ceases movement, the intent of the pilot being that the operation has ended. For aircraft using chocks, effectively it is the time when the chocks have been removed until the chocks are replaced, that is, 'chock to chock'.

What is a notifiable event when an aircraft is in operation?

Under the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 (HSWA) you must notify us when certain work-related events occur while the aircraft was in operation.

A notifiable event is when any of the following occurs as a result of work:

  • a death
  • notifiable illness or injury
  • a notifiable incident.

Use our Notifiable Event tool below to help you with understanding which events are notifiable, what you need to do and when, and how to notify us. 

Deaths, injuries or illnesses that are unrelated to work are not notifiable events eg:

  • a diabetic worker slipping into a coma at work
  • a worker being injured driving to work, when that driving is not part of their work
  • injuries to patients or rest home residents that are triggered by a medical reason (eg injuries from a fall caused by a stroke)
  • a worker fainting from a non-work related cause.

Notifiable Event Infographic

CAA HSU have developed a one page (A3 sized) Infographic on  Notifiable Event that set out on one page a quick reference guide to 'What is a Notifiable Event?'.  This can be opened, saved and printed for use in your business. 

Notifiable event tool

Use our notifiable event tool to help you understand which events are notifiable, what you need to do and when, and how to notify us when an aircraft was in operation.

Event Type

Notifiable death

Notifiable injury

Notifiable illness

Notifiable incident

What Happened?

A person has been killed as a result of work

Amputation

Serious head injury

Serious eye injury

Serious burn

Spinal injury

Loss of bodily functions

Serious lacerations

Skin separation

An injury that requires (or would usually require) the person to be admitted to hospital for immediate treatment

An injury that requires (or would usually require) the person to receive medical treatment within 48 hours of exposure to a substance

A person has been made unwell as a result of work

People's health and safety are seriously threatened or endangered as a result of a work situation

What you must do

If someone has been killed as a result of work, then you MUST notify us immediately.

Phone 0508 4 SAFETY (0508 472 338)

In case of emergency, phone 111.

What you must do when someone is killed as a result of work

 

 

If a person has suffered the amputation of any part of the body, and the injury requires immediate treatment other than first aid, then you MUST notify us.

Amputation includes the amputation of:

  • a limb (arm or leg)
  • other parts of the body (hand, foot, finger, toe, nose, ear)

Find out more about what you must do if someone suffers a notifiable injury as a result of work

If a person has suffered a serious head injury, and the injury requires immediate treatment other than first aid, then you MUST notify us.

A serious head injury includes:

  • skull fracture
  • losing consciousness
  • blood clot or bleeding in the brain
  • damage to the skull that may affect organ or facial function
  • temporary or permanent memory loss from a head injury.

Find out more about what you must do if someone suffers a notifiable injury as a result of work

If a person has suffered a serious eye injury, and the injury requires immediate treatment other than first aid, then you MUST notify us.

A serious eye injury includes:

  • injury that results in, or is likely to result in the loss of an eye or vision
  • injury caused by an object entering the eye (eg metal fragment, wood chip)
  • contact with any substance that could cause serious eye damage.

A serious eye injury does not include exposure to a substance or object that only causes discomfort to the eye.

Find out more about what you must do if someone suffers a notifiable injury as a result of work

If a person has suffered a serious burn, and the burn needs intensive or critical care such as a compression garment or skin graft, then you MUST notify us. 

You do NOT need to contact us if the burn can be treated by washing the wound and applying a dressing. 

Find out more about what you must do if someone suffers a notifiable injury as a result of work

If a person has suffered a spinal injury, and the injury requires immediate treatment other than first aid, then you MUST notify us. 

A spinal injury includes an injury to the cervical, thoracic, lumbar or sacral vertebrae, including discs and spinal cord.

A spinal injury does NOT include back strain or bruising. 

Find out more about what you must do if someone suffers a notifiable injury as a result of work

If a person has suffered the loss of a bodily function including, for example, through electric shock or acute reaction to a substance used at work, and the injury requires immediate treatment other than first aid, then you MUST notify us. The loss of a bodily function includes loss of:

  • consciousness
  • speech
  • movement of a limb
  • function of an internal organ
  • senses eg smell, touch, taste, sight or hearing.

Loss of bodily function does NOT include:

  • Fainting not due to a work-related cause
  • A sprain, strain or fracture that does not require hospitalisation (except for skull and spinal fractures).


Find out more about what you must do if someone suffers a notifiable injury as a result of work

If a person has suffered serious lacerations and the injury requires immediate treatment other than first aid, then you MUST notify us.

Serious lacerations include:

  • serious deep cuts that cause muscle, tendon, nerve or blood vessel damage, or permanent impairment
  • tears to flesh or tissue which may require stitching, gluing or other treatment to prevent the losing their function and/or getting infected.

A serious laceration does NOT include: 

  • superficial cuts treatable by cleaning the wound and applying a dressing
  • minor tears to flesh or tissue. 

Find out more about what you must do if someone suffers a notifiable injury as a result of work

If a person has suffered an injury resulting in skin separating from underlying tissue (degloving or scalping), and the injury requires immediate treatment other than first aid, then you MUST notify us.

This includes skin separating from underlying tissue where tendons, bones, or muscles are exposed.

Find out more about what you must do if someone suffers a notifiable injury as a result of work

‘Admitted to hospital’ means being admitted to hospital as an inpatient for any length of time – it doesn’t include being taken to hospital for out-patient treatment by a hospital’s A&E department, or for corrective surgery at a later time, such as straightening a broken nose.

Find out more about what you must do if someone suffers a notifiable injury as a result of work

For example, burns form skin exposure or inhalation of toxic chemicals that require medical treatment.

Medical treatment is considered to be a treatment by a registered medical practitioner (e.g. a doctor).

Find out more about what you must do if someone suffers a notifiable injury as a result of work

If a person contracts an illness as a result of work and needs to be admitted to hospital for immediate treatment or needs medical treatment within 48 hours of exposure to a substance, then you MUST notify us.

In additon, you MUST notify us if a person contracts a serious illness as a result of:

  • working with micro-organisms
  • providing treatment or care to a person
  • contact with human blood or bodily substances
  • handling or contact with animals, their hides, skins, wool or hair, animal carcasses or waste products
  • handling or contact with fish or marine animals
  • exposure to a substance, natural or artificial such as a solid, liquid, gas or vapour.

Find out more about what you do when someone suffers a notifiable illness as a result of work

If someone has been exposed to a serious or immediate risk to their health and safety because of an unplanned or uncontrolled work incident, then you MUST notify us as soon as possible.

Find out more about which unplanned or uncontrolled incidents are notifiable

Event Type

Notifiable death

Notifiable injury

Notifiable illness

Notifiable incident

What Happened?

Notifiable death

A person has been killed as a result of work

Notifiable injury

Amputation

Serious head injury

Serious eye injury

Serious burn

Spinal injury

Loss of bodily functions

Serious lacerations

Skin separation

An injury that requires (or would usually require) the person to be admitted to hospital for immediate treatment

An injury that requires (or would usually require) the person to receive medical treatment within 48 hours of exposure to a substance

Notifiable illness

A person has been made unwell as a result of work

Notifiable incident

People's health and safety are seriously threatened or endangered as a result of a work situation

What you must do

Notifiable death

A person has been killed as a result of work:

If someone has been killed as a result of work, then you MUST notify us immediately.

Phone 0508 4 SAFETY (0508 472 338)

In case of emergency, phone 111.

What you must do when someone is killed as a result of work

 

 

Notifiable injury

Amputation:

If a person has suffered the amputation of any part of the body, and the injury requires immediate treatment other than first aid, then you MUST notify us.

Amputation includes the amputation of:

  • a limb (arm or leg)
  • other parts of the body (hand, foot, finger, toe, nose, ear)

Find out more about what you must do if someone suffers a notifiable injury as a result of work

Serious head injury:

If a person has suffered a serious head injury, and the injury requires immediate treatment other than first aid, then you MUST notify us.

A serious head injury includes:

  • skull fracture
  • losing consciousness
  • blood clot or bleeding in the brain
  • damage to the skull that may affect organ or facial function
  • temporary or permanent memory loss from a head injury.

Find out more about what you must do if someone suffers a notifiable injury as a result of work

Serious eye injury:

If a person has suffered a serious eye injury, and the injury requires immediate treatment other than first aid, then you MUST notify us.

A serious eye injury includes:

  • injury that results in, or is likely to result in the loss of an eye or vision
  • injury caused by an object entering the eye (eg metal fragment, wood chip)
  • contact with any substance that could cause serious eye damage.

A serious eye injury does not include exposure to a substance or object that only causes discomfort to the eye.

Find out more about what you must do if someone suffers a notifiable injury as a result of work

Serious burn:

If a person has suffered a serious burn, and the burn needs intensive or critical care such as a compression garment or skin graft, then you MUST notify us. 

You do NOT need to contact us if the burn can be treated by washing the wound and applying a dressing. 

Find out more about what you must do if someone suffers a notifiable injury as a result of work

Spinal injury:

If a person has suffered a spinal injury, and the injury requires immediate treatment other than first aid, then you MUST notify us. 

A spinal injury includes an injury to the cervical, thoracic, lumbar or sacral vertebrae, including discs and spinal cord.

A spinal injury does NOT include back strain or bruising. 

Find out more about what you must do if someone suffers a notifiable injury as a result of work

Loss of bodily functions:

If a person has suffered the loss of a bodily function including, for example, through electric shock or acute reaction to a substance used at work, and the injury requires immediate treatment other than first aid, then you MUST notify us. The loss of a bodily function includes loss of:

  • consciousness
  • speech
  • movement of a limb
  • function of an internal organ
  • senses eg smell, touch, taste, sight or hearing.

Loss of bodily function does NOT include:

  • Fainting not due to a work-related cause
  • A sprain, strain or fracture that does not require hospitalisation (except for skull and spinal fractures).


Find out more about what you must do if someone suffers a notifiable injury as a result of work

Serious lacerations:

If a person has suffered serious lacerations and the injury requires immediate treatment other than first aid, then you MUST notify us.

Serious lacerations include:

  • serious deep cuts that cause muscle, tendon, nerve or blood vessel damage, or permanent impairment
  • tears to flesh or tissue which may require stitching, gluing or other treatment to prevent the losing their function and/or getting infected.

A serious laceration does NOT include: 

  • superficial cuts treatable by cleaning the wound and applying a dressing
  • minor tears to flesh or tissue. 

Find out more about what you must do if someone suffers a notifiable injury as a result of work

Skin separation:

If a person has suffered an injury resulting in skin separating from underlying tissue (degloving or scalping), and the injury requires immediate treatment other than first aid, then you MUST notify us.

This includes skin separating from underlying tissue where tendons, bones, or muscles are exposed.

Find out more about what you must do if someone suffers a notifiable injury as a result of work

An injury that requires (or would usually require) the person to be admitted to hospital for immediate treatment:

‘Admitted to hospital’ means being admitted to hospital as an inpatient for any length of time – it doesn’t include being taken to hospital for out-patient treatment by a hospital’s A&E department, or for corrective surgery at a later time, such as straightening a broken nose.

Find out more about what you must do if someone suffers a notifiable injury as a result of work

An injury that requires (or would usually require) the person to receive medical treatment within 48 hours of exposure to a substance:

For example, burns form skin exposure or inhalation of toxic chemicals that require medical treatment.

Medical treatment is considered to be a treatment by a registered medical practitioner (e.g. a doctor).

Find out more about what you must do if someone suffers a notifiable injury as a result of work

Notifiable illness

A person has been made unwell as a result of work:

If a person contracts an illness as a result of work and needs to be admitted to hospital for immediate treatment or needs medical treatment within 48 hours of exposure to a substance, then you MUST notify us.

In additon, you MUST notify us if a person contracts a serious illness as a result of:

  • working with micro-organisms
  • providing treatment or care to a person
  • contact with human blood or bodily substances
  • handling or contact with animals, their hides, skins, wool or hair, animal carcasses or waste products
  • handling or contact with fish or marine animals
  • exposure to a substance, natural or artificial such as a solid, liquid, gas or vapour.

Find out more about what you do when someone suffers a notifiable illness as a result of work

Notifiable incident

People's health and safety are seriously threatened or endangered as a result of a work situation:

If someone has been exposed to a serious or immediate risk to their health and safety because of an unplanned or uncontrolled work incident, then you MUST notify us as soon as possible.

Find out more about which unplanned or uncontrolled incidents are notifiable